Traditional vs symbolic logic: homeschoolers need them BOTH

When we first started homeschooling our daughter, our affinity toward classical education programs was clear. Choosing a curriculum, however, was less straightforward. The first curriculum provider we chose to work with was Memoria Press. Memoria Press is based out of Louisville, Kentucky, and operates classical schools out of local churches around the country. We ended … Continue reading Traditional vs symbolic logic: homeschoolers need them BOTH

The political left’s revisionist history continues

Here is a video of Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg telling a room full of children that "the people who wrote the Constitution did not know that slavery was a bad thing." https://twitter.com/JayCostTWS/status/1211733574124220417 No one can claim that Buttigieg is uneducated. He reminds everyone ad nauseam that he was a Rhodes scholar. But despite receiving … Continue reading The political left’s revisionist history continues

American History for homeschoolers (elementary)

I am in the process of preparing for our daughter's upcoming academic year. For us, that begins in April - a totally arbitrary date that corresponds to when we relocated to Florida. We are planning on switching to American history from world history this year. We have covered world history in previous years using Susan … Continue reading American History for homeschoolers (elementary)

Historians destroy the NYT “1619 Project,” but it will still be used in K-12 classrooms

One of the things you discover quickly when you start homeschooling is the immense gulf in quality between the resources that are available to teach children and the curricula that are used in public schools. Typical homeschooling curricula are teaching kids the equivalent of several grade levels beyond what their peers in public schools are … Continue reading Historians destroy the NYT “1619 Project,” but it will still be used in K-12 classrooms

Formal gardens, new mountain bike trails, and a pristine beach

Elise had her weekly riding lesson this morning, in an extraordinarily soggy ring from all of the rain we've been having. Even the pony wanted nothing of it. Afterward, for fun, we decided to load up our bicycles and head to Washington Oaks Gardens State Park. The park is located at the former winter home … Continue reading Formal gardens, new mountain bike trails, and a pristine beach

Absinthe, early auto racing, and John D. Rockefeller’s house

Our family loves serendipity, and today was quite full of it. We had to drive down to Ormond Beach this morning to check out a posh place for boarding dogs. We are planning to drive down to Fort Lauderdale for the International Boat Show later this month (a weekend full of yachts!) and we can't … Continue reading Absinthe, early auto racing, and John D. Rockefeller’s house

The culture wars of late 18th century America

I rather enjoyed reading about the experiences with students at William & Mary that contributed to Thomas Jefferson taking on the project of education reform (from today's Wall Street Journal): By this time he had lost all patience with the college in Virginia‚Äôs colonial capital, and no wonder. As Mr. Taylor shows in his unsparing … Continue reading The culture wars of late 18th century America